Woman admits to catfishing her best friend’s husband so she can catch him cheating

Woman admits to catfishing her best friend’s husband so she can catch him cheating

By Savanna Young For Daily Mail Australia

Published: | Updated:

A woman has admitted to deliberately catfishing her best friend’s husband in a bid to catch him cheating.

The unidentified woman went to extra lengths to call him out after his wife was informed he was on a dating app. 

After he vehemently denied any wrongdoing to his partner and insisted the profile was fake, the friend took the matter into her own hands. 

‘My best-best friend of 20 years was recently told someone saw her husband on a dating app,’ she wrote into Mamamia’s advice column, Don’t Freak Out.

‘When she confronted him, his response was that his phone had been hacked, and it was a fake account. He said he reported it and it was taken down.’

A woman has admitted to deliberately catfishing her best friend’s husband in a bid to catch him cheating 

She explained her friend and her husband have been together for some time and even have a child together. 

The woman, who wrote in to the column under the alias ‘Concerned Catfish’, said she knew with the information her friend was provided ‘wasn’t a fake account’ and he’d created it himself.

‘He has pulled the wool over her eyes, she is too naive to question him and has just moved on believing his story,’ she wrote. 

She explained she created a fake Instagram account and he began liking her stories and ‘interacting with her’.

The woman, who wrote into the advice column under the alias ‘Concerned Catfish’, said she knew with the information her friend was provided ‘wasn’t a fake account’ and he’d created it himself 

‘The interactions are seemingly innocent, but why are you going out of your way to be friends with her when you are married??’ the woman asked.

‘I feel sick knowing all of this and not being able to tell my bestie. I don’t feel it’s enough “concrete” evidence to show he is being shady but I feel so sick knowing this is all going on.’

The conflicted woman concluded her submission by asking whether she should tell her best friend, wait for the husband to take the next step further or just ‘leave it’.

Columnist Holly Wainwright responded by sympathising with the writer who appears to be looking out for her friend who is at risk of getting hurt.

But she said the woman’s fake account is only ‘making it worse.’

‘This is absolutely none of your business and you need to delete that account immediately,’ she said.

‘I understand the motivation for your catfishing. I get that you believe that you are within a hair’s breath of holding irrefutable evidence of his f**kwittery in your hot little phone.’

Wainwright added the ‘Concerned Catfish’ situation will most likely end in tears. 

‘But if he does, is your friend going to thank you?’ she asked.

‘When you confront her with the “evidence” her husband is saying inappropriate things to women he doesn’t know on the Internet, do you also have an expectation of what you want her to do with that?’ 

Wainwright added the woman’s job is to be a best friend, as well as offer support – not be a detective.

‘If he is who you think he is, something will happen,’ she concluded. ‘And maybe your friend will tell you, and maybe she won’t. And maybe she’ll leave him, and maybe she won’t. But your friendship with her shouldn’t be dependent on any of those things.’

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